How Much Do Gutter Guards Cost?

Typical Range:

$598 - $2,205

Find out how much your project will cost.

Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by 2,377 HomeAdvisor members. Embed this data

How We Get This Data

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

  • Homeowners use HomeAdvisor to find pros for home projects.
  • When their projects are done, they fill out a short cost survey.
  • We compile the data and report costs back to you.

Updated August 22, 2022

Written by HomeAdvisor.

Installing gutter guards costs between $598 and $2,205, with an average price of $1,402. This breaks down to $0.50 to $20 per linear foot depending on the type and materials used in construction. For an average house with about 200 feet of gutters, the total cost to buy and install gutter guards is between $100 for low-cost options and $2,000 for high-end guards.

Cleaning out gutters is a challenging task for many homeowners, and gutter guards simplify the process by keeping leaves and debris out of the gutter so water flows freely. Installing gutter guards is a relatively simple process, though several variables impact the price. 

Average cost for gutter guards is $1,400, ranging from $600 to $2,200

Gutter Guard Installation Cost Calculator

Let's calculate cost data for you. Where are you located?

Where are you located?

National Average $1,402
Typical Range $598 - $2,205
Low End - High End $175 - $4,000

Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by 2,377 HomeAdvisor members.

Gutter Guard Costs

A primary expense here is the gutter guards themselves. The price of materials ranges from $0.50 to $20 per linear foot, but these costs fluctuate depending on the brand and the type of guard you purchase. 

Brands

There are many popular manufacturers creating gutter guards and related accessories. Many companies specialize in different types and use unique materials. They also boast differing price ranges. Here are several popular brands and some pertinent information on each one. 

  • LeafGuard: This company offers one-piece micro-mesh gutter guard systems that also include a cover. These designs require professional installation, as they are fabricated to custom lengths as part of the manufacturing process. This is an expensive option at $15 to $45 per linear foot for both materials and installation.  

  • Master Shield:  This system is backed by a lifetime no-clog warranty, which offers peace of mind. Master Shield gutter guards are self-cleaning, safe for shingles, and help prevent roof rot. They also feature an adjustable heating element to prevent ice buildup. You’ll pay $18 to $21 per linear foot for materials and installation. 

  • All American Gutter Protection: These gutter guards also come with a lifetime warranty and cost $15 to $20 per linear foot for materials and installation. These all-aluminum systems excel with severe weather and drastic temperature changes without warping or bending. 

  • RainDrop: A relatively budget-friendly option, at $4 to $5 per linear foot for materials. These guards are designed for DIY installations, with a polypropylene grid system that arrives in preset lengths with easy mounting options. 

  • EasyOn: These stainless-steel gutter guards also feature steel micromesh. They are designed for DIY installation jobs and even come with video instructions. You’ll pay $3 to $4 per linear foot for materials. 

Types

In addition to brands, there are many types of gutter guard systems available, each made from unique materials and featuring specific cost ranges. Here are some of the more common types of gutter guards. 

  • Mesh or Micro-Mesh: These designs block debris of all sizes, including small items like pine needles. These are extremely effective guards, though often require professional installation. You’ll pay $2 to $4 per linear foot for the materials, with labor costing extra. 

  • Foam: Foam gutter guards ship in a single piece, making for a perfect DIY installation. The foam allows water to flow even with debris sitting on top of the gutter. This type of gutter guard does require yearly cleaning and costs $2 to $3.50 per linear foot for materials. 

  • Brush: As the name suggests, these guards use large bristles to capture debris, which allows water to flow freely. Brush gutter guards offer a simple installation and excel with large pieces of debris, though they struggle with smaller items like maple spinners and pine needles. Brush guards cost $3 to $4.25 per linear foot for materials. 

  • Screen: These screen gutter guards work similarly to a screen door and snap onto your gutters, allowing for DIY installations. They come in plastic and steel versions, with plastic screen guards costing $0.40 to $1 per linear foot and steel screen guards costing $1.50 to $3.50 per linear foot. This type of guard does feature relatively large holes when compared to other types, so small debris slips through occasionally. Plastic models are also easily blown off in windy conditions.

Gutter Guard TypeCost for 200 Linear Feet
Mesh$400 – $800
Foam$400 – $650
Brush$600 – $900
Plastic Screen$50 – $200
Steel Screen$800 – $1,500
Surface Tension$1,000 – $5,000

Gutter Guard Installation Cost Factors

On average, professional installation costs $9 per linear foot. However, there are many factors that impact the overall price. 

Cost Per Foot

As previously mentioned, the average price of installation comes out to $9 per linear foot. On the low end, you’ll pay $130 for a quick installation of 200 linear feet of plastic screen gutter guards. On the high end, you’ll pay $5,000 to $7,000 to professionally install 200 linear feet of a pricier type of gutter guard made with high-end materials like steel. 

Gutter Material 

There are many gutter guard materials available, just as there are many materials available for the actual gutters. Modern homeowners choose between PVC vinyl gutters, which offer superior weather resistance, and wood gutters for an aesthetic flourish. There are also copper metal gutters for advanced protection. 

As for gutter guards, however, there are essentially four main materials used during the manufacturing process. 

  • Plastic: This is the least expensive material, leading to budget-friendly gutter guards. However, plastic guards are light and easily blown away by windy conditions. 

  • Stainless steel: This is the go-to material for mesh and micro-mesh gutter guards, offering increased durability when compared to other materials, in addition to rust resistance, corrosion resistance, warping resistance, and other protections. Steel costs are on the higher end. 

  • Aluminum: This material is great for resisting rust and corrosion, though it is not as rugged as stainless steel or other types of metal. Additionally, tree branches and some pine cones can pierce the guards, necessitating repairs or replacement. Aluminum guards are on the lower-cost side. 

  • Copper: This is a great option for homes with pre-existing copper guards, offering aesthetic similarities. Copper offers many of the same benefits as stainless steel, but it is a rarer metal and, therefore, slightly more expensive.

Get Quotes from Gutter Pros Near You
Get Estimates Now

Snap vs. Screw-On

Different guard types require different methods of installation. Some snap into place and require minimal cuts or alterations, while others require screws or bolts and need significant altering to fit in the trough. Snap-style gutter guards are often appropriate for DIY installations, while screw-on guards require professional installation. As always, the more complicated the work, the higher the price.

Accessibility and Home Height

Accessibility issues increase labor costs, as difficult-to-reach areas require more contractors, lifts, scaffolding, safety equipment, and additional time to complete the job. In other words, installing a gutter guard on a single-story house costs less than completing the same procedure for two or more stories. Additionally, if contractors must avoid water or if there is a steep drop, installers charge more. 

Roof Configuration

Installation costs more on multiple rooflines with 90-degree bends where they come together. If you have just one long, straight roofline, installation is easier and costs less. Also, steeply pitched roofs require additional safety equipment which increases labor costs. Talk to your pro as you gather estimates to check if your roof configuration impacts the overall price. 

Roof Type

Along with roof configuration, the roof type also impacts gutter guard installation. For instance, slate and solid tile roof designs necessitate a more complex installation process, increasing the labor cost. Additionally, some gutter guards only integrate with certain kinds of shingles to work properly. There are so many roof types and shingle types out there, so talk to your pro as you gather estimates to discuss material and price options. 

Location and Climate 

Choose the right gutter guard for your location and climate. Plastic screen guards don’t do well with extreme winds and reverse curve guards struggle with heavy downpours of rain. Snow and ice also represent unique struggles for certain types of gutter guards. Do your research and talk to pros to ensure you pick the right guard to prevent ice damming at the edge of your roofline. 

DIY vs. Hiring a Gutter Guard Pro

Some single-piece gutter guards are actually designed for DIY enthusiasts, while others are strictly for professional gutter guard installers. Though you’ll save on labor by going the DIY route, laying down gutter guards is potentially dangerous work. Additionally, even DIY-friendly guards require some serious equipment to ensure a smooth installation process. 

If you choose the DIY route, gather up the following materials and tools and work slowly to prevent accidental roof damage, particularly when screwing through the fascia boards and gutters.

Tools and Material Cost
Tin snips $18
Grinder with metal cutting blades $65
Extension ladder $100 – $200
Lift rental $200 – $500 per day
Gloves and safety goggles $25

As a note, improper installation likely voids any current roofing warranties, so exercise caution or rely on a pro. 

FAQs

Are gutter guards worth it? 

Gutter guards are a pricy accessory for your roof, leading many to wonder if they are worth it. However, the price of installing these guards is merely a fraction of what you’ll pay when dealing with issues related to a blocked gutter. Blocked gutters lead to cracked foundations, flooding, and many more extremely expensive problems. So, yes, to protect the rest of your home, gutter guards are worth it. 

What are the advantages of gutter guards?

As the name suggests, gutter guards protect your gutters from becoming clogged with twigs, branches, leaves, pine cones, and all kinds of other errant items. Not only do these gutter guards reduce the frequency of gutter-related mishaps, but they drastically reduce the level of cleaning required for most gutters. Some of the higher-grade gutter guards eliminate the need for professional gutter cleaning entirely. Results vary, though, so talk to your pro.

What are the disadvantages of gutter guards?

Despite being an efficient add-on for your roof, gutter guards are not perfect. They stop debris from clogging up your gutters, but the debris left resting on the guard can block water from draining. This is a particular issue when dealing with screen guards. Also, some gutter guards are susceptible to extreme weather conditions, as severe winds and intense storms can knock them from the roof. Many types of guards also require annual cleaning, which requires roof access. 

Find & Hire Local Gutter Guard Pros
Get Estimates Now